OEI

Organización
de Estados
Iberoamericanos

{short description of image}
Para la Educación,
la Ciencia
y la Cultura

Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad
CTS

Ciencia, Tecnología, Naturaleza y Sociedad
Base de Datos Bibliográfica

María Teresa Santander Gana
Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial
Universidad de Santiago de Chile

 Base de Datos dirigida al entendimiento de las relaciones Ciencia, Tecnología, Naturaleza y Sociedad

1.- Didáctica de la Ciencia y la Tecnología
 Selección de Libros
 Selección de Artículos
Regresar a Índice

1.- Didáctica de la Ciencia y la Tecnología

Selección de Libros

1. AIKENHEAD, G.S., RYAN, A., The development of a new instrument: Views on Science-Technology-Society (VOSTS), Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Univ., 1991.

2. AIKENHEAD, G.S., RYAN, A., Student’s view on the epistemology of science, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Univ., 1991.

3. AIKENHEAD, G.S., Logical reasoning in science and technology, Toronto, John Wiley of Canada, 1991.

4. ARONIAN, R., BRINKERHOFF, R.F., The Exeter conference on secondary school science education, Exeter (NH), Philips Exeter Academy, 1980.

5. BORG, W., GALL, M., Educational research: An introduction (5ª ed.), Nueva York, Longman, 1989.

6. BOYLE, C., WHEALE, P., STURGESS, B., People, science and technology, Totowa (NJ), Barns & Noble Books, 1984.

7. BRANDT, R.S., ed., Content of the Curriculum, Washington (DC), ASC, 1988.

8. BRINKERHOFF, R.F., Values in school science: Some practical materials and suggestions 2ª ed.), Exeter (NH), Philips Exeter Academy, 1986.

9. BRINKERHOFF, R.F., YAGER, R.E., eds., Science and technology education for tomorrow’s world, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1986.

10. BYBEE, R.W., ed., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985.

11. BYBEE, R.W., CARLSON, J., McCORMACK, A.J., eds., Redesigning science and technology education, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984.

12. COLLETTE, A., CHIAPPETTA, E., Science instruction in the middle and secondary school (2ªed.), San Luis, Merrill, 1989.

13. COOLEY, W., KLOPFER, L., Test and understanding science (Form W), Princeton (NJ), Education Testing Service, 1961.

14. CHEEK, D., Science, Technology and Society education, Ithaca, New York Univ.Press, 1992.

15. CHISMAN, D.G., ed., New Trends in integrated science teaching, Belgium, United Nationals Educat., 1990.

16. DISINGER, J.F., ed., Trends and Issues in Environmental Education: EE in School Curricula, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1987.

17. FENHAM, P.J., ed., Development and Dilemmas in Science Educations, Londres, Falmer Press, 1988.

18. FISHBEIN, M., AJZEN, I., Belief, Actitude, Intention and Behavior: An Introduction to Theory and Research, Reading (MA), Addison-Wesley, 1975.

19. GELLER, S., WINNETT, R., EVERETT, P., Preserving the Environment: New Strategies for Behavioral Change, Nueva York, Pergamon Press, 1982.

20. GOODLAD, J., A Place Called School: Prospect for the Future, Nueva York, McGraw Hill, 1984.

21. GRAY, D., BORDEN, R., WEIGEL, R., Ecological Beliefs and Behaviours: Assessment and Change, Westport (CN), Greenwood Press, 1985.

22. HARMS, N., YAGER, R.E., What research says to the science teacher (vol.III), Washington (DC), NSTA, 1981.

23. HICKMAN, F.M., PATRICK, J., BYBEE, R.W., Science/ technology/ society: A framework for curriculum reform in secondary school science and social studies, oulder (CO), SSC INC., 1987.

24. HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., RAMSEY, J., Science-technology- society: Investigating and evaluating STS issues and solutions, Champaign (IL), Stipes Publishing Co., 1990.

25. HUNGERFORD, H., LITHERLAND, R., PEYTON, R., et al., Investigating and Evaluating Environmental Issues and Actions: Skill Development Modules, Champaign (IL), Stipes Publishing Co.

26. HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., RAMSEY, J., A Prototype Environmental Education Curriculum for the Middle School, París, UNESCO-UNEP, 1990.

27. HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., DIXON, B., et al., An Environmental Education Approach to the Training of Elementary Teachers: A Teacher Training Programme, París, UNESCO-UNEP, 1988.

28. IZUZQUIZA, I., El proyecto filosófico de J. D. García Bacca, Barcelona, Anthropos, 1984.

29. JAMES, R.K., ed., Science, technology and society: Resources for science educators, Columbus (Ohio), SMEAC, 1985.

30. JASANOFF, S., et al., eds., Handbook of S.T. & S., Bristol, 4S and Sage, 1993.

31. JONES, M.V., A Technology Assessment Methodology: Some Basic Propositions, The Mitre Corporation, 1971.

32. KERLINGER, F.N., Foundations of behavioural research (2ª ed.), Nueva York, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1973.

33. KIRK, R., Experimental design procedures for the behavioural sciences, Belmont (CA), Brooks/Cole Publishing, 1986.

34. MAJUMDAR, S., ROSENFIELD, L., RUBBA, P.A., et al., eds., Science Education in the United States: Issues, Crisis and Priorities, Easton, Pennsylvania Acad. of Sc., 1991.

35. MARCINKOWSKI, T., VOLK, T., HUNGERFORD, H., An Environmental Education Approach to the Training of Middle Level Teachers: A Teacher Education Especialization, Paris, UNESCO-UNEP.

36. MERRIAM, S. B., Case study research in education: A qualitative approach, Londres, Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1988.

37. NSTA, Science-technology-society: Science education for the 1980’s, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1982.

38. NSTA, Science-technology-society: A new effort for providing appropriate science for all, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1990.

39. NSTA, Scope, sequence and coordination of secondary school science, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1990.

40. PAPERT, S., Desafío a la mente. Computadores y educación, Buenos Aires, Galápago, 1981.

41. PATTON, M.Q., Qualitative evaluation and research methods (2ª ed.), Newbury Park, Sage Publications, 1990.

42. PENICK, J.E., MEINHARD, R., eds., Focus on excellence: Science/technology/society (vol. I), Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984.

43. PIETERS, M., ed., The Proceedings of Teaching for Sustaining Development Workshop, Utrecht, Dutch Institute for CD, 1991.

44. RAMSEY, J., HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., A Science-Technology-Society Case Study: Municipal Solid Waste, Champaign (IL), Stipes Publishing Co., 1989.

45. RIFKIN, J., Declaration of an heretic, Boston, Routledge & Keagan Paul, 1985.

46. ROBERTS, D.A., Scientific Literacy: Towards balance in setting goals for school science programs, Ottawa, Science Council of Canada.

47. RUBBA, P.A., Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale, Bloomington, Indiana Univ.Press, 1976.

48. SACKS, A.B., ed., Current Issues VI: The Yearbook of Environmental Education and Environmental Studies, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1980.

49. SACKS, A.B., ed., Current Issues in Enviromental Education and Environmental Studies, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1983.

50. SACKS, A.B., ed., Monographs in Environmental Education and Environmental Studies, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1984.

51. THIRUNARAYANAN, M. O., ed., Handbook of STS Resource, vol. I: A Theoretical and Conceptual Overview of Science, Technology and Society Education, Tempe, Arizona State Univ., 1992.

52. WAKS, L.J., ed., Technological literacy for the new majority: Enhancing secondary science education through STS for urban/minority youth (cap. 7), Washington (DC), US Depart. of Education, 1988.

53. WELCH, W.W., Science process inventory, Cambridge (MA), Harvard Univ. Press, 1967.

54. WIDMAN, R., SIMMONS, D., CAPLAN, R., et al., Behavioral Approaches to Energy Planning in Organizations: A Selected Review of the Literature, Chicago (IL), Council Planing Librarians, 1984.

55. YAGER, R.E., Science , Technology and Society: Resources for Science Educators, Columbus (Ohio), AETS Yearbook, ERIC, 1985.

56. YAGER, R.E., The status of science-technology-society reform efforts around the world, Hong Kong, ICASE, 1992.

57. YAGER, R.E., ed., The science, technology, society movement: what research says to the science teacher (vol. VII), Washington (DC), NSTA, 1993.

58. ZIMAN, J., Teaching and learning about science and society, Cambridge, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1980.

59. ZIMAN, J., La fuerza del conocimiento. La dimensión científica de la sociedad, Madrid, Alianza, 1980.

60. ZIMAN, J., El conocimiento público. Un ensayo sobre la dimensión social de la ciencia, México, FCE.

61. ZIMAN, J., Enseñanza y aprendizaje sobre la ciencia y la sociedad, México, FCE.

Selección de Artículos

62. ABRAMS, I.S., ”The sustainable society”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, ” society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 46-61.

63. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”Science curricula and preparation for social responsability”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 129-143.

64. BRINKERHOFF, R.F., ”Introducing social issues into science courses: Methods and a short-item approach”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 221-227.

65. BRONKHORST, H.K., ”Establishing science, technology and society in the school curriculum”, en BYBEE, R.W., Redesigning science and technology education, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984, 170-173.

66. BRONKHORST, H.K., ”Ethics, values and science teaching”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 213-220.

67. BYBEE, R.W., CARLSON, J., McCORMACK, A.J., ”Redesigning science and technology education: An agenda for action”, en BYBEE, R.W., Redesigning science and technology education, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984, 245-248.

68. BYBEE, R.W., ”Global problems and science education policy”, en BYBEE, R.W., Redesigning science and technology education, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984, 60-75.

69. BYBEE, R.W., ”The sisyphean question in science education: What should the scientifically and technologically illiterate person know, value and do as a citizen?”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 79-93.

70. BYBEE, R.W., BONNSTETTER, R., ”STS: What do the teachers think?”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 117-127.

71. CARLSON, J., ”Methods of teaching STS topics”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 200-203.

72. CHAMPEAU, R., GROSS, M., WILKE, R., ”An assessment of teacher’s understanding and use of Goals for Curriculum Development in Environmental Education”, en SACKS, A.B., Current Issues VI: The Yearbook of Environmental Education and Environmental Studies, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1980, 218-226.

73. CHARLES, C., ”Education: From awareness to responsible action”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 263-268.

74. FLEMING, R., ”How students respond to social issues in science class”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 204-212.

75. GALLAGHER, J.J., ”Educating high school teachers to instruct effectively in science and technology”, en BYBEE, R.W., Redesigning science and technology education, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984, 216-221.

76. HICKMAN, F.M., ”A case study of innovation”, en BYBEE, R.W., Redesigning science and technology education, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1984, 104-121.

77. HICKMAN, F.M., ”Charting a course through risk and controversy: Strategies for science teacher”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington(DC), NSTA, 1985, 175-199.

78. HUNGERFORD, H., ”Environmental education and student behaviors”, en DISINGER, J.F., Trends and Issues in Environmental Education: EE in School Curricula, Columbus(Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1987, 25-38.

79. HUNGERFORD, H., TOMERA, A., WILSON, R., ”An analysis of the emphasis placed on overt environmental behaviour in studies abstracted in Research in Environmental Education, 1971-1980", en SACKS, A.B., Current Issues in Environmental Education and Environmental Studies, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1983, 183-198.

80. HURD, P.D., ”A rationale for a science, technology and society theme in science education”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 94-101.

81. JACOBSON, W.J., ”In the service of peace against the nuclear holocaust”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 70-77 .

82. JARCHO, I.S., ”Curricular approaches to teaching STS: A report on units, modules and courses”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 162-173.

83. JOHNSON, R., JOHNSON, D.G., ”Using structure controversy in the science classrooms”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 228-234.

84. LOZZI, L., ”A summary of research in environmental education, 1971-1982; The second report of the National Commission on Environmental Education Research”, en

SACKS, A.B., Monographs in Environmental Education and Environmental Studies, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1984.

85. McLAREN, M., ”The problem of curriculum infusion in environmental education”, en DISINGER, J.F., Trends and Issues in Environmental Education: EE in School Curricula, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1987, 51-57.

86. PEIL, E.J., ”Technological literacy”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 155-161.

87. PENICK, J.E., ”A brief look at some outstanding science, technology and society programmes”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 148-154.

88. RAMSEY, J., ”Responsible environmental behaviour: The goal of environmental education”, en PIETERS, M., The Proceedings of Teaching for Sustaining Development Workshop, Utrecht, Dutch Institute for CD, 1991.

89. ROSENTHAL, D.B., ”Biology education in a social and moral context”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington (DC), NSTA, 1985, 112-116.

90. RUBBA, P.A., ”Integrating STS into school science instruction: Salience for inner-city poor and minority learners”, en WAKS, L.J., Technological literacy for the “new majority” : Enhancing secondary science education through STS for” urban/minority youth (cap. 7), Washington (DC), US Depart. of Education, 1988.

91. RUBBA, P.A., WIESENMAYER, R., ”Integrating STS into school science”, en MAJUMDAR, S., Science Education in the United States: Issues, Crisis and Priorities, Easton, Pennsylvania Acad. of Sc., 1991, 186-194.

92. RUBBA, P.A., ”Reflections on science teacher development and enhancement in STS education”, en THIRUNARAYANAN, M.O., Handbook of STS Resource, vol. I: A” Theoretical and Conceptual Overview of Science, Technology and Society Education, Tempe, Arizona State Univ., 1992, 86-93 .

93. RUBBA, P.A., ”An STS perspective on environmental education in the school curriculum”, en DISINGER, J.F., Trends and Issues in Environmental Education: EE in School Curricula, Columbus (Ohio), ERIC/SMEAC, 1987, 63-71 .

94. RUBBA, P.A., WIESENMAYER, R., ”Increased action by students”, en YAGER, R.E., The science, technology, society movement: what research says to the science teacher (vol. VII), Washington (DC), NSTA, 1993, 169-175.

95. RUTHERFORD, F., AHLGREN, A., ”Rethinking the science curriculum”, en BRANDT, R.S., Content of the Curriculum, Washington (DC), ASC, 1988, 75-90.

96. SANMARTIN, J., LUJAN, J.L., ”Educación en ciencia, tecnología y sociedad”, en SANMARTIN, J., Estudios sobre sociedad y tecnología, Barcelona, Anthropos, 1992, 67-84.

97. THORSTHEIM, H.I., ”Systems thinking: The positive influence of STS on education motivation”, en BYBEE, R.W., Science, technology, society, Washington(DC), NSTA, ” 1985, 236-242.

98. VOLK, T., HUNGERFORD, H., TOMERA, A., ”A national survey of curriculum needs”, en WIDMAN, R., Behavioral Approaches to Energy Planing in Organizations: A Selected Review of the Literature, Chicago (IL), Council Planing Librarians, 1984.

99. WIESENMAYER, R., TURPIN, C., ANDRESKI, S., ”Infusing science-technology-society studies into the urban school science curriculum: a model & examples”, en WAKS, L.J., Technological literacy for the “new majority”: Enhancing secondary science education through STS for urban/minority youth (cap. 7), Washington (DC), US Depart. of Education, 1988.

100. YAGER, R.E., ”Science, technology, society: A mayor trend in science education”, ” en CHISMAN, D.G., New Trends in integrated science teaching, Belgium, United Nationals Educat., 1990, 44-48.

101. YAGER, R.E., ”Restructuring science teachers education programs as they move toward an STS focus”, en YAGER, R.E., Science Technology and Society: Resources for Science Educators, Columbus (Ohio), AETS Yearbook. ERIC, 1985, 46-55.

102. AGUIRRE, J., HAGGERTY, S., LINDER, C., ”Student-teacher’s conceptions of science teaching and learning: a case study in preservice science education”, International Journal of Science Education, 12(4), 1990, 381-390.

103. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”The integration of STS into science education”, Theory into, Practice, 31(1), 1992, 27-35.

104. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”The content of STS education”, STS Research Network Missive, 2(3), 1986, 18-23.

105. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”An analysis of four ways of assessing student beliefs about STS topics”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 25(8), 1988, 607-629.

106. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”Teacher decision making: The case of Prairie High”, Journal of, Research in Science Teaching, 21(2), 1984, 167-186.

107. AIKENHEAD, G.S., FLEMING, R., RYAN, A., ”High school graduates’ beliefs about science-technology-society I: Methods and issues in monitoring student views”, Science Education, 71(2), 1987, 145-161.

108. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”The measurement of high school students’ knowledge about science and scientists”, Science Education, 57(4), 1973, 539-549.

109. AIKENHEAD, G.S., RYAN, A., ”The development of a new instrument: Views on science-technology-society VOSTS”, Science Education, 76(5), 1992, 477-491.

110. AIKENHEAD, G.S., ”High School graduates’ beliefs about science-technology-society III: Characteristics and limitations of scientific knowledge”, Science Education, 71 (4), 1987, 459-487.

111. AJZEN, I., FISHBEIN, M., ”Attitude-behaviour relationships: A theoretical analysis and review of empirical literature”, Psychological Bulletin, 84(5), 1977, 888-918.

112. BAKER, D., PIBURN, M., ”Teachers’ perceptions of the effect of a scientific literacy course on subsequent learning in biology”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 27(5), 1990, 477-492.

113. BEHNKE, F.L., ”Reactions of scientists and science teachers to statements bearing on certain aspects of science and science teaching”, School Science and Mathematics, 61, 1961, 193-207.

114. BEN-CHAIM, D., ZOLLER, U., ”The STS outlook profiles of Israeli high school students and their teachers”, International Journal of Science Education, 13(4), 1991, 447-458.

115. BILLEH, V., HASSAN, O., ”Factors affecting teachers’ gain in understanding the nature of science”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 12(3), 1975, 209-219.

116. BORDEN, R., ”Psychology and ecology: Beliefs in technology and the diffusion of ecological responsability”, Journal of Environmental Education, 16(2), 1984, 14-19.

117. BORDEN, R., SCHETTINO, A., ”Determinants of environmentally responsible behavior: Facts or Feelings ?”, Journal of Environmental Education, 10(4), 1979, 35-39.

118. BRAGAW, D.H., ”Society, technology, and science: Is there room for another imperative ?”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 4-12.

119. BRIDGELAND, W., SOFRANKO, A., ”Community structure and issue-specific influences on community mobilization over environmental quality”, Urban Affairs Quarterly, 11(2), 1975, 186-214.

120. BRINKERHOFF, R.F., ”A new technique for teaching societal issues”, Journal of College Science Teaching, Mayo, 1985, 475-479.

121. BRINKERHOFF, R.F., ”An experimental method for infusing STS into secondary school curricula”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 5, 1985, 130-137.

122. BRUSIC, S.A., ”Achieving STS goals through experiential learning”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 44-51.

123. BYBEE, R.W., ”The science-technology-society (STS) theme in science curriculum: The policies-practices gap.”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 294-302.

124. BYBEE, R.W., MAU, T., ”Science and technology related to global problems : An international survey of science educators”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 23(7), 1986, 599-618.

125. BYBEE, R.W., ”BONNSTETTER, R., What research says: Implementing the science-technology-society theme in science education: Perceptions of science teachers”, School Science and Mathematics, 87(2), 1987, 144-152.

126. BYBEE, R.W., ”Science education and science-technology-society (STS) themes”, Science Education, 71(5), 1987, 667-683.

127. BYBEE, R.W., HARMS, N., WARD, B., et al., ”Science, society, and science education”, Science Education, 64(3), 1990, 377-395.

128. BYRNE, M., JOHNSTONE, A., ”How to make science relevant”, School Science Review, 70(251), 1988, 43-46.

129. CAREY, R.L., NYLES, G.S., ”An analysis of the understanding of the nature of science by prospective secondary science teacher’s”, Science Education, 52(4), 1968, 358-363.

130. CAREY, R.L., NYLES, G.S., ”An analysis of experienced science teachers understanding of the nature of science”, School Science and Mathematics, 70, 1970, 366-376.

131. CARPENTER, S.R., ”Philosophical Issues in Technology Assessment”, Philosophy of Science, 44, 1977, 574-593.

132. CARPENTER, S.R., ”Scale in Technology: A Critique of Design Assumptions Research”, Philosophy and Technology, 8, 1985, 67-76.

133. CARTER, C., ”Science-technology-society and access to scientific knowledge”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 273-279.

134. COOK, S., BERRENBERG, J., ”Approaches to encouraging conservation behavior: A review and conceptual framework”, Journal of Social Issues, 37(2), 1981, 73-107.

135. COTHAN, J., SMITH, ”Development and validation of the conception of scientific theories test”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 18(5), 1981, 387-396.

136. CHEEK, D., ”Evaluating learning in STS education”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 64-72.

137. CHIAPPETTA, E., RAMSEY, J., ”Curricular models for science programs in Texas”, Texas Science Teacher, 20(4), 1991, 11-15.

138. DE VORE, P.W., ”Technological literacy and social purpose”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 59-63.

139. FENSHAM, P.J., ”Approaches to the teaching of STS in science education”, International Journal of Science Education, 10(4), 1988, 346-356.

140. FLEMING, R., ”High school graduates’ beliefs about science-technology-society II: The interaction among science, technology and society”, Science Education, 71(2), 1987, 163-186.

141. FLEMING, R., ”Literacy for a technological age”, Science Education, 73(4), 1989, 391-404.

142. FULLICK, P., ”Addressing science and technology issues in the United Kingdom: The SATIS project”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 36-43.

143. GARDNER, P.L., ”Measuring ambivalence to science”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 24(3), 1987, 241-247.

144. GOOD, R., HERRON, J., LAWSON, A., ”The domain of science education”, Science Education, 69(2), 1985, 139-141.

145. GRUENDER, C., TOBIN, K., ”Promise and prospect”, Science Education, 75(1), 1991, 1-8.146.

146. HANKOOS, G., PENICK, J.E., ”The influence of classroom climate on science process and content achievement of community college students”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(7), 1983, 629-637.

147. HARVEY, G.D., ”Environmental education: a delineation of substantive structure”, Dissertation Abstracts International, 38, 1977, 611-612.

148. HEATH, P.A., ”Organizing for STS teaching and learning: The doing of STS”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 52-58.

149. HEATH, P.A., ”Integrating science and technology instruction into the social studies:Basic elements”, Theory into Practice, 54(4), 1990, 207-209.

150. HINES, J.M., HUNGERFORD, H., TOMERA, A., ”Analysis and synthesis of research on responsible environmental behavior: A meta-analysis”, Journal of Environmental Education, 18(2), 1987, 1-8.

151. HOFSTEIN, A., AIKENHEAD, G.S., RIQUARTS, K., ”Discussions over STS at the fourth IOSTE symposium”, International Journal of Science Education, 10(4), 1988, 357-366.

152. HORSLEY, A., ”The effects of a social learning experiment on attitudes and behavior toward environmental conservation”, Environmental Behavior, 9(3), 1977, 349-384.

153. HUDSON, D., ”Toward a philosophically more valid science curriculum”, Science Education, 72(1), 1988, 19-40.

154. HUNGERFORD, H., PEYTON, R., WILKE, R., ”Goals for curriculum development in environmental education”, The Journal of Environmental Education, 11(3), 1980, 42-47.

155. HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., ”Changing learner behavoir through environmental education”, Journal of Environmental Education, 21(3), 1990, 8-21.

156. HURD, P.D., ”Closing the educational gaps between science, technology, and society”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 251-259.

157. HURD, P.D., ”Perspectives for the reform of science education”, Phi Delta Kappan, 67(5), 1985, 353-358.

158. JORDAN, J., HUNGERFORD, H., TOMERA, A., ”Effects of two residential environmental workshops on high school students”, Journal of Environmental Education, 18(1), 1986, 15-22.

159. KLINE, S.J., ”What is technology ?”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 1, 1985, 215-218.

160. KOSLOWSKY, M., KLUGER, A., YINON, Y., ”Predicting behavior: combining intention with investment”, Journal of Applied Psychology, 73(1), 1988, 102-106.

161. KOWAL, J., ”Science, technology and human values: A curricular approach”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 267-272.

162. KRANZBERG, M., ”STS: It’s as simple as xyz”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 234-241.

163. KRONHOLM, M., RAMSEY, J., ”Issues and analyses”, Science and Children, 29(2), 1991, 20-23.

164. LAYTON, E.T., ”Revaluing the T in STS”, International Journal of Science Education, 10(4), 1988, 364-378.

165. LAYTON, E.T., DAVEY, A., JENKINS, E., ”Science for specific social purposes”, Studies in Science Education, 13, 1986, 27-52.

166. LAYTON, E.T., ”Empowerment of people: The educational challenge of science for specific social purposes (SSSP)”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 6(2), 1986, 210-218.

167. LEDERMAN, N.G., DRUGAR, M., ”Classroom factors related to changes in students’conceptions of the nature of science”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 22(7), 1985, 649-662.

168. LEDERMAN, N.G., ”Relating teaching behavior and classroom climates to changes in students’ conceptions of the nature of science”, Science Education, 70(1), 1986, 3-19.

169. LEDERMAN, N.G., ZEIDLER, D., ”Science teachers’ conceptions of the nature of science: Do they really influence teaching behavior?”, Science Education, 71(5), 1987, 721-734.

170. LEDERMAN, N.G., ”Students’ and teachers’ understanding of the nature of science: A reassessment”, School Science and Mathematics, 86(2), 1986, 91-99.

171. LEDERMAN, N.G., O’MALLEY, M., ”Students perceptions of tentativeness in science: Development, use and sources of change”, Science Education, 74(2), 1990, 225-239.

172. LIPSEY, M., ”Personal antecedents and consequences of ecologically responsible behavior: A review”, Catalog of Selected Documents in Psychology, 70(4), 1977.

173. LUCUS, A., ”Scientific literacy and informal learning”, Studies in Science Education, 10, 1983, 1-36.

174. MARKER, G.W., ”Integrating science-technology-society into social studies education”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 20-26.

175. MAY, W.T., ”What are the subjects of STS really?”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 73-83.

176. MERRYFIELD, N.M., ”STS and global perspectives”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 288-293.

177. MILLAR, R., WYNNE, B., ”Public understanding of science: From contents to process”, International Journal of Science Education, 10(4), 1988, 388-398.

178. MILLER, J.D., ”Scientific Literacy: A Conceptual and Empirical Review”, Daedalus, 112, 1983, 29-48.

179. MILLER, P.E., ”A Comparison of the Abilities of Secondary Teachers and Students of biology to understand science”, Iowa Academy of Science, 70, 1963, 510-513.

180. MITCHENER, C., ANDERSON, A.R., ”Teachers’ perspective: Developing and Implementing an STS curriculum”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 26(4), 1989, 351-369.

181. MOORE, R., SUTMAN, F., ”The Development, field test and validation of an inventory of scientific attitudes”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 7, 1970, 85-94.

182. MUNBY, H., ”The place of teachers’ beliefs in research on teacher thinking and decision making, and an alternative methodology”, Instructional Science, 11, 1982, 201-225.

183. MUNBY, H., ”Thirty studies involving the scientific attitude inventory: What confidence can we have in this instrument?”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(2), 1983, 141-162.

184. MUNBY, H., ”Some implications of language in science education”, Science Education, 60(1), 1976, 115-124.

185. McDOUGALL, G., CLAXTON, J., RITCHIE, B., ”Consumer Energy Research: A review”, Journal of Consumer Research, 8(3), 1981, 343-354.

186. OST, D.H., YAGER, R. E., Guidelines for excellence in science-technology-society programs, STS Reporter, 1(3), 1985, 4-32.

187. PENICK, J.E., YAGER, R.E., ”Science at work in the real world”, Educational Leadership, 42(1), 1984.

188. RAMSEY, J., HUNGERFORD, H., ”The effects of issue investigation and action training on environmental behavior in seventh grade students”, The Journal of Environmental Education, 20(4), 1989, 29-34.

189. RAMSEY, J., HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., ”A technique for analyzing environmental issues”, Journal of Environmental Education, 21(1), 1989, 26-30.

190. RAMSEY, J., KRONHOLM, M., ”Science related social issues in the elementary classroom: The extended case study approach”, The Journal of Elementary Science Education, 32(2), 1991, 2-13.

191. RAMSEY, J., RICKSON, R., ”Environmental knowledge and attitudes”, Journal of Environmental Education, 13(1), 1977, 24-29.

192. RAMSEY, J., HUNGERFORD, H., TOMERA, A., ”The effects of environmental action and environmental case study instruction on the overt environmental behavior of eighth-grade students”, Journal of Environmental Education, 13(1), 1981, 24-30.

193. RAMSEY, J., ”A curriculum framework for community-based STS issue instruction”, Education and Urban Society, 22(1), 1989, 40-53.

194. RAMSEY, J., HUNGERFORD, H., ”So... you want to teach issues?”, Contemporary Education, Primavera, 1989, 137-142.

195. RAMSEY, J., ”Effects of issue investigation and action training on characteristics associated with environmental behavior in eighth grade students”, Journal of Environmental Education, 22(4), 1991, 67-74.

196. RAMSEY, J., HUNGERFORD, H., VOLK, T., ”Analyzing the issues of STS”, The Science Teacher, 57(3), 1990, 60-63.

197. RAMSEY, J., ”Scientific claims versus scientific knowledge”, The Science Teacher, 58(8), 1991, 20-27.

198. REMY, R.C., ”The need for science/technology/society in the social studies”, Theory into Practice, 54(4), 1990, 203-207.

199. ROSENTHAL, D.B., ”Two approaches to STS education”, Science Education, 73(5), 1989, 581-589.

200. RUBBA, P.A., WIESENMAYER, R., ”Goals and competencies for precollege STS education: Recommendations based upon recent literature in environmental education”, The Journal of Environmental Education, 19(4), 1988, 38-44.

201. RUBBA, P.A., WIESENMAYER, R., ”A study of the qualities teachers recommend in STS issue investigation and action instructional materials”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 11(4), 1991, 212-219.

202. RUBBA, P.A., BARCHI, B., WAMBAUGH, R., ”STS in the nation’s schools: Six states take the lead”, STS Reporter, 3(1), 1987, 1-4.”

203. RUBBA, P.A., ”Integrating STS into school science and teacher education: Beyond awareness”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 303-308.

204. RUBBA, P.A., McGUYER, M., WAHLUND, T., ”The effects of infusing STS vignettes into the genetics unit of biology on learner outcomes in STS and genetics: A report on two investigations”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 28(6), 1991, 537-552.

205. RUBBA, P.A., ”An Investigation of the semantic meaning assigned to concepts affiliated with STS education and of STS education and of STS instructional practices amonga”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 26(8), 1989, 687-702,

206. RUBBA, P.A., ANDERSEN, H., ”Development of an instrument to assess secondary students’ understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge”, Science Education, 62(4), 1978, 449-458.

207. RUBBA, P.A., ”Recommended competencies for STS education in grades 7-12", The High School Journal, 70(3), 1987, 145-150.

208. RUBBA, P.A., WIESENMAYER, R., ”A goal structure for precollege STS education: A proposal based upon recent literature in environmental education”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 5(6), 1985, 573-580.

209. RUBBA, P.A., ”Issue investigation and action skills: Necessary components of precollege STS education”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 6(2), 1986, 301-307.

210. RUBBA, P.A., ”STS education in action: What research says to teachers”, Social Education, 54(4), 1990, 201-203.

211. RUBBA, P.A., ”The current state of research in precollege STS education: A position paper”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 7(1), 1987, 248-252.

212. RUBBA, P.A., ”Perspectives on STS education”, School Science and Mathematics, 87(3), 1987, 181-186.

213. RYAN, A., ”High school graduates’ beliefs about science-technology-society IV: The characteristics of scientists”, Science Education, 71(4), 1987, 489-510.

214. SCHMIDT, D., ”Test on understanding science: A comparision among school groups”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 4, 1967, 365-366.

215. SHAMOS, M., ”The lesson every child need not learn: Scientific literacy for all is an empty goal”, The Sciences, 28(4), 1988, 14-20.

216. SIA, A., HUNGERFORD, H., TOMERA, A., ”Selected predictors of responsible environmental behavior: An analysis”, Journal of Environmental Education, 17(2), 1986, 31-40.

217. SIMPSON, P., McLAUGHLIN, J., VOLK, T., ”A survey concerning teachers’ perceptions of the importance of SRSI issues”, Journal of Environmental Education, 21(1), 1989, 31-37.

218. SNOW, C.P., ”Core concepts for Science and Technology Literacy”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 7(5), 1987, 720-729.

219. SNOW, R.E., ”The Curriculum Frontier”, Social Education, 54(4), 1990, 195-197.

220. SPLITTGERBER, F., ”Science-technology-society themes in social studies: Historical perspectives”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 242-250.

221. VAN LIERE, K., DUNLAP, R., ”The social basis of environmental concern: A review of hypothesis, explanations and empirical evidence”, Public Opinion Quarterly, 44(2), 1980, 181-197.

222. VOLK, T., ”Project synthesis and environmental education”, Science Education, 68(1), 1984, 23-33.

223. WAKS, L.J., ”The responsibility spiral: A curriculum framework for STS education”, Theory into Practice, 31(1), 1992, 13-19.

224. WAKS, L.J., ed., ”Technological literacy: Proceedings of the first national conference”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 6(2, 3), 1986.

225. WAKS, L.J., ed., ”Technological literacy: Proceedings of the third national conference”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 7, 1988.

226. WAKS, L.J., PRAKASH, M., ”STS education and its three step-sisters, Bulletin of Science”, Technology and Society, 5(2), 1985, 105-116.

227. WAKS, L.J., BARCHI, B., ”STS in U.S. school science: Perceptions of leaders and their implications for STS education”, Science Education, 76(1), 1992, 79-90.

228. WAKS, L.J., ed., ”Technological literacy: Proceedings of the second national conference”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 7(1, 2), 1987.

229. WAKS, L.J., ”A technological literacy credo”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 7(1, 2), 1987, 357-366.

230. WIRTH, A.G., ”Issues in the reorganization of work: Implication for education”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 280-287.”

231. WRAGA, W.G., HLEBOWITSH, P.S., ”Science, Technology, and the Social Studies”, Social Education, 54(4), 1991, 194-195.”

232. YAGER, R.E., ”What’s needed-if STS is to be a major reform in science education”, Teachers Clearinghouse for Science and Society Education Newsletter, 11(2), 1992.

233. YAGER, R.E., ”S/T/S produces superior student performance”, Chautauqua Notes, 3(5), 1988, 1-3.

234. YAGER, R.E., ”Problem solving: The STS advantage”, Curriculum Review, 26(3), 1987, 19-21.

235. YAGER, R.E., ”Science/technology/society as a curriculum organizer”, Social Science Perspectives Journal, 1(3), 1987, 1-16.

236. YAGER, R.E., ”STS perspectives: The problems with STS education”, NASTS NEWS, 3(1), 1990.

237. YAGER, R.E., ”The features of STS that make it a major reform in science education”, Science Education, 1(1), 1992, 5-11.

238. YAGER, R.E., ”S/S/T approaches enhance student attitudes”, Chautauqua Notes, 3(1), 1987, 1-3.

239. YAGER, R.E., BYBEE, R.W., GALLAGHER, J.J., ”An analysis of the current crises in the discipline of science education”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 19(5), 1982, 377-395.

240. YAGER, R.E., KRAJCIK, J., ”Success of students in a college physics course with and without experiencing a high school course”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 26(7), 1989, 599-608.

241. YAGER, R.E., ”Toward a new science literacy for all”, The Hoosier Science Teacher, 18(2), 38-44.

242. YAGER, R.E., MYERS, L., BLUNCK, S.M., et al., ”The Lowa Chautauqua program: What assessment results indicate about STS instruction”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 12(1), 1992, 26-38.

243. YAGER, R.E., ”Changes in perceptions of science for third, seventh and eleventh grade students”, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 22(4), 1985, 347-358.

244. YAGER, R.E., ”Evidence needed for S/T/S merits”, Teachers Clearinghouse for Science and Society Education Newsletter, 3(1), 1988, 2-12.

245. YAGER, R.E., ”Technology as a context for school science”, Educational Leadership, 44(5), 1987, 94-96.

246. YAGER, R.E., ”The STS approach parallels constructivist practices”, Science Education, 3(2), 1992, 18-20.

247. YAGER, R.E., WIDMAN, R., SIMMONS, D., ”Toward new meaning for school science”, Educational Leadership, 41(4), 1984, 12-18.

248. YAGER, R.E., ”Science/technology education: Necessary for all”, NASSP Curriculum Report, 13(1), 1983.

249. YAGER, R.E., PORTER, R., MacNEILL, I., ”Preparing students for a technological world”, Curriculum Review, 24(3), 1985.

250. YAGER, R.E., ”Scope & Sequence: An STS perspective”, Science Scope, 12(4), 1989.

251. YAGER, R.E., ”Science/technology/society as a major reform in science education: Its importance for teacher education”, Teaching Education, 2(3), 1991, 91-100.

252. YAGER, R.E., DE YOUNG, R., CASTILLA, A., ”In defense of defining science education as the science/society interface”, Science Education, 69(2), 1985, 163-169.

253. YAGER, R.E., ”A new focus for school science: S/T/S”, School Science and Mathematics, 88(3), 1988, 181-190.

254. YAGER, R.E., ”STS- What does it mean?”, Science Scope, 10(1), 1986, 26-27.

255. YAGER, R.E., McCORMACK, A.J., ”Assessing teaching/learning successes in multiple domains of science and science education”, Science Education, 73(1), 1989, 45-58.

256. YAGER, R.E., PENICK, J.E., ”Societal issues at the heart of the science curriculum”, Educational Leadership, 43(5), 1985.

257. YAGER, R.E., ”Science/Technology/Society: The current focus for achieving useful science”, Scientia Yugoslavica, 13(3, 4), 1988, 107-112.

258. YAGER, R.E., ”The Science/Technology/Society Movement in the United States: Its Origin, Evolution and Rationale, ”Social Education, 54(4), 1990, 198-201.

259. YAGER, R.E., ”S/T/S and the affective domain”, Chautauqua Notes, 2(3), 1986, 3-4.260. YAGER, R.E., MACHINNU, BLUNCK, S.M., ”Science/technology/society as reform of science in the elementary school”, Journal of Elementary Science Education, 4(1), 1992, 1-13.

261. YAGER, R.E., HLEBOWITSH, P.S., McCOMAS, W., ”Incorporating science and technology issues into the English classroom”, Arizona English Bulletin, 29(1), 1986, 92-98.

262. YAGER, R.E., ”Science-technology-society as reform”, School Science and Mathematics, 93(3), 1993, 145-151.

263. YAGER, R.E., ”STS science teaching emphasizes problem solving”, The Education Digest, 53(1), 1987, 39-41.

264. YAGER, R.E., TAMIR, P., HUANG, D., ”An STS approach to human biology instruction affects achievement and attitudes of elementary science majors”, The American Biology Teacher, 54(6), 1992, 349-355.

265. YAGER, R.E., ”The case for STS as reform”, NSTA Reports, 9, Mayo, 1991, 32-33.

266. YAGER, R.E., ”What kind of school science leads to college success?”, The Science Teacher, 53(9), 1986, 21-25.

267. YAGER, R.E., ”Comparison of standard student performance when science study is organized around typical concepts versus local issues”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 9(2), 1989, 171-181.

268. YAGER, R.E., ”Approaching scientific literacy goals in general education science courses”, Journal of College Science Teaching, 43(4), 1989, 273-275.

269. YAGER, R.E., ”STS results in significant gains”, Chautauqua Notes, 4(7), 1989.

270. YAGER, R.E., PENICK, J.E., ”Public attitude toward science and science education”, Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society, 6(6), 1986, 535-540.

271. YAGER, R.E., ”What differentiates S/T/S from standard science?”, The Science Teacher, 51(2), 1988, 29-30.

272. YAGER, R.E., MILLER, P.E., SNOW, R.E., ”STS-Something new in education, Bulletin of Science”, Technology and Society, 5(6), 1985, 568-572.

273. ZEIDLER, D., LEDERMAN, N.G., ”The effect of teachers’ language on students’conceptions of the nature of science”, Science Education, 26(9), 1989, 771-783.

274. ZOLLER, U., DONN, S., WILD, R., et al., ”Students’ versus their teachers’ beliefs and positions on science/technology/ society-oriented issues”, International Journal of Science Education, 13(1), 1991, 25-36.

275. ZOLLER, U., ”Teaching/learning styles, preference and students’ teaching evaluation in S/T/E/S-focused science teacher education: A quasiquantitative probe of case study”, Journal of Research in ScienceTeaching, 28(7), 1991, 593-607.

276. ZOLLER, U., EBENEZER, J., MORELY, K., et al., ”Goal attainment in science-technology-society (s/t/s) education and reality: The case of British Columbia”, Science Education, 74(1), 1990, 19-36.

277. ZUGA, K., ”The technology education experience and what it can contribute to STS”, Theory into Practice, 30(4), 1991, 260-266.

Índice Siguiente Capítulosigue

© Maria Teresa Santander Gana, Santiago de Chile, 1998
Edita: Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos
para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura OEI
Bravo Murillo, 38
28015 Madrid (España)
Composición: Joaquín Asenjo y Óscar Macías

Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad CTS-OEI Página Principal de la OEI Más datos por email: weboei@oei.es